The Way I Think is Different.

The way I think is different. No one understands.

My mind wanders – bouncing from one idea to another – one topic to another. I can see how many things can fit together that do not seem related. I can understand multiple perspectives and translate an idea so each person/entity can understand the idea from their perspective. I find some things very interesting and other things very boring. I need to take notes to stay focused, otherwise my mind wanders. I enjoy a challenge, a puzzle, a mystery, an adventure. I am game to try new things. I do not have to have the answers. I enjoy finding a spectrum of answers. I like to figure out things in the world. I like to figure out things in my mind.

I am aware of the different kinds of intelligences and learning styles. These help me to have a better understanding of different aspects of how my mind works. It still does not provide all the answers. Part of the key is each of us has a unique combination of the factors described. So, yes the way I think is unique just as I am. So I can describe that: I am strong in words. I can see things in graphs, maps, sequential. I learn by hearing, seeing, writing, and doing. Still the way the different facts, bits of information, experiences connect are unique to me.

I tried to explain how I was thinking. It did not compute with teachers or peers. At times it created a problem. Teachers thought I was being disruptive. They had a difficult time keeping me engaged. One solution was for me to start teaching math to the class in sixth grade. In high school I took the advanced classes – the challenge changing schools 3-4 times during high school – each time starting over with the teachers. With peers being accepted and rejected was a major issue. Not fitting in with my classmates – too smart, military dependent, too young, always new to the area. In college peer issues lessened – less issues around age and being “smart”.

At work the way I think is both an asset and a liability. As an asset – my interaction with my colleagues is a problem solver, a mentor, a leader. On the other hand, as a liability – always wanting to learn, new ideas and suggestions, frustration with clients and colleagues “not getting it”, and easily bored.

Part of the journey has been to learn to use this tool – my mind. Learn the different angles, cuts, processes, dynamics it has and how to apply them for the task at hand. Each attempt, each experiment, each trial, each experience brings new information and application. This journey expands my understanding of my uniqueness, my potential, my talents and gifts. Yes I understand better how I am special. Learning my mind has broadened my understanding of other’s minds and how they work. It has developed tools for better understanding and growing potential for me and others. A map has been created with many roads/paths from the various starting points to the destinations of choice.

Come take a journey – an adventure —– understand your uniqueness in the way you think — your potential and grow the potential.

Comments

  1. Elizabeth (Beth) LaMie says

    Edith,
    Very interesting to hear how you think. I didn't realize that anyone else feels the same way. I've always taken lots of notes, not so much to review later, but to help me stay focused on the particular topic at hand.

    Some days I feel like the old "Ricochet Rabbit" (which probably means I'm really dating myself – again)when my mind bounces from one thing to another and another and… Apparently, you get the idea.

    I love the idea of growing our own potential. That is such an important awareness that we can control. And expanding our own minds and boundaries is awesome.

    Great posts. I'm tickled to become your first "follower"!

    Beth LaMie
    http://www.bethlamie.com

  2. nodding to all of this, except the military kid-ness.

    "At work the way I think is both an asset and a liability. As an asset – my interaction with my colleagues is a problem solver, a mentor, a leader. On the other hand, as a liability – always wanting to learn, new ideas and suggestions, frustration with clients and colleagues “not getting it”, and easily bored."

    Most employers don't seem to appreciate workers who always think "out-of-the-box" do they?

    Square Peg Guy

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